That Winch Over There…

African American Slave Baby

Have you ever been called a “winch” or a “hoe”? I have often heard Black women refer to each other as winches, hoes, and bitches.  The terms sound much like a term of endearment, a term which defines their friendship as very close.  Black women can, have and will refer to their friends as bitches, but that term can become a “fighting” word when used by the “wrong” person, i.e. someone they dislike.  I would think that in the 21st century we would no longer have a need to refer to each other using such derogatory adjectives.
The children in school call each other the same names and does anyone know what a “motherfucker” really is or where the term is derived from?  Well, I looked it up and it’s defined as according to Dictionary.com , “a mean, despicable, or vicious person…” If that be true, then our young men and women are apparently using the term incorrectly.  From what I have heard and seen the term is occasionally used to describe a person that has performed some type of farce or  something negative.  This term is used by both male and females towards each other.   Hmm, I wonder of they knew the definition –  would they use the term so effortlessly?
While looking through the history of North Carolina’s school system I came across a document titled, “The Beginnings of Public Education in North Carolina; A Documentary History, 1790-1840. Volume I:” and I was shocked to read the following excerpt:
“But the present-day idea that it is the duty of the State to provide education for all, regardless of race or financial condition, is nowhere clearly stated in these documents, except in the memorial of the Friends, sent to the legislature of 1834, wherein they protest against certain repressive slavery laws such as prohibiting slaves and free negroes from preaching and making it a crime to teach a slave to read and to write. This memorial boldly declared “it unnecessary to urge the incontrovertible arguments that might be advanced from reason and Religion, to prove that it is the indispensable duty of the Legislature of a Christian people to enact laws and establish regulations for the literary instruction of every class, within its limits; and that such provisions should be consistent with sound policy, tend to strengthen the hands of Government and promote the peace and harmony of the community at large.” This fine educational statement, far in advance of the times, fell on deaf ears. Some of our so-called wisest men of that day continued to talk about “the education of the poor” and to introduce measures for the education of that class and to propose still harsher measures governing slaves. But Jeremiah Hubbard, or whoever wrote this Friends’ memorial, was the wisest educational prophet of the period, in that he saw clearly the necessity of educating all classes of the people and the futility of making laws to repress the natural instinct of all human beings for more knowledge.”
Meanwhile back at the ranch…
Stumbling upon this next piece (See Below) that speaks to the winch which was the catalyst for this story along with a news story that ran a few days ago here in Charlotte, NC.  The local news aired a story about a group of female students who allegedly beat up an Administrator in the school.  The video showed several girls beating on the woman at Harding University High School.  My emotions remained calm – I thought to myself, “If those young ladies only knew the depth of who they were and the value they could leave behind as beautiful black intelligent woman who should want to make a choice to make a difference in their lives and lives of their “increase” not only would they not engage in such behavior, but they would have such a humble sense of pride in their walk, talk, and overall characteristic behavior.
“Will of Alexander Dickson,
(June 19, 1813.)
IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN, I, Alexander Dickson, of the county of Duplin, being infirm in Body, but of sound and perfect memory, blessed be God, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say,
All landed property to be sold.
IMPRIMIS. My will is, and so I direct, that all my just debts and personal expenses be first paid out of my estate by my Executors hereinafter named. It is my will and desire that all my Lands be sold at Public Auction by my executors, for the highest price that may be got, in the following manner, that is to say, the Manor Plantation containing 300 acres bought of Joseph Dickson, deceased, The 213 acres adjoining the same bought of Austin Beasley, and 4 1-2 acres adjoining that, where the dead tree is, bought of Thomas McGee and 86 acres between his own and Joseph Brays lines, bought of said Bray, containing in the whole 716 1-4 acres, which said parcels of land, as above described, is to be sold all in one lott. Also 150 acres on the West side of Maxwell Swamp on the head of Jimmie’s Branch bought of Abner Huggins, that to be sold in one lott. Also 50 acres on the South side of the head of . . . . . . . . Branch, bought of Robert Dickson, deceased. Also 50 acres adjoining the same, at the East end and joining John McGowan’s line, Patented by myself, the two above mentioned pieces to be sold in one lott. Also 300 acres, or thereabouts, below the cross roads and on both sides of the main road, adjoining and between Gabriel H. James, Robert Dickson and John Hunter’s lines to be sold in one lott, Patented by myself.
Bequest to John Dickson.
Item–I leave and bequeath to my nephew John Dickson (son of my Brother Robert Dickson, of Cumberland County, Blockers Ferry) my young Negro Winch named Amy and her increase to him and his heirs forever.”
Lastly, those of us who know that we know that we know, must present ourselves holy and acceptable in all that we do and with all that we come in contact with.  Sure we may make mistakes and find ourselves overwhelmed with emotion when tragedy strikes, but we must continue to press towards the mark of the high calling.  We all have a calling that one way or another we must engage in. We must present ourselves as a mother and father to our children, as wives and husbands to our spouses,  as teacher and educator to our students, as guardian to the unattended, and as visionaries to the lost.
We must set the standard in all that we do to foster the “inside emotional” growth of our young adults.   It would behoove us to no longer answer to names which are not imprinted on our birth certificates…
MsConcerned
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About MsConcerned

“Upon descending our threaded words on the web by a steep and hazardous precipice of readers requires constant review.”
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