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#Goodnight Reggie Lucas

(May 19, 2018) He was a Grammy-winning musician and a hitmaking songwriter and producer who spread a lot of joy over the years. We’re sad to report the death of Reggie Lucas, one of the great soul music songwriters and producers of the late 70s and early 80s, at age 65.

(May 19, 2018) He was a Grammy-winning musician and a hitmaking songwriter and producer who spread a lot of joy over the years. We’re sad to report the death of Reggie Lucas, one of the great soul music songwriters and producers of the late 70s and early 80s, at age 65.

Lucas’s daughter, Lisa (the head of the National Book Foundation), posted today on Facebook, “After a long and arduous struggle with his physical heart (his emotional one was perfect) he was called home. I wish he’d had more time, I wish we’d all had more time with him, but he left this world absolutely covered in love, with his hands held and his family beside him. I’m glad he’s at peace now.”

Along with songwriting partner James Mtume, Lucas wrote some of the classiest soul music songs of the late 70s, many of which helped the formation of the urban adult contemporary genre that would dominate a decade later. Hits like “The Closer I Get to You” by Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway, and “I Never Knew Love Like This Before,” by Stephanie Mills, were monster smashes that have grown in stature to true classics.

The Queens, New York, born artist was obsessed with music of all kinds from childhood, and that impacted his expansive talent expressed in his work. He wrote, “At thirteen, I was jamming in small high school bands and listening to everything I could get my hands on. Psychedelic rock, funk, blues, jazz rock, soul, folk rock, you name it, I was into it. The sixties in NYC was a mecca for live music, and from the Fillmore to Central Park to Woodstock to the clubs in Greenwich Village, I was there.” By age 17, he was working in “Me and Mrs. Jones” singer Billy Paul’s band, and two years later joined the band of legendary jazz man Miles Davis. It was during a hiatus with Davis that Lucas was recruited by friend Mtume into Roberta Flack’s backing band, and when their historic musical collaboration began.

Lucas also produced Madonna’s debut album and wrote her #1 hit “Borderline,” helping to launch one of the biggest stars of the latter 20th Century. He also worked with such acts as Lou Rawls, The Four Tops, Randy Crawford and more. He also formed the band Sunfire, which had a brief recording career in the 1980s.

When a musical giant like Lucas dies at an age when many are still vibrant, it is always sad. But Reggie Lucas created so many happy moments for soul and pop music fans, that his work will be celebrated long after the sadness of today ends. Rest in peace, Mr. Lucas.

Lucas’s daughter, Lisa (the head of the National Book Foundation), posted today on Facebook, “After a long and arduous struggle with his physical heart (his emotional one was perfect) he was called home. I wish he’d had more time, I wish we’d all had more time with him, but he left this world absolutely covered in love, with his hands held and his family beside him. I’m glad he’s at peace now.”

Along with songwriting partner James Mtume, Lucas wrote some of the classiest soul music songs of the late 70s, many of which helped the formation of the urban adult contemporary genre that would dominate a decade later. Hits like “The Closer I Get to You” by Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway, and “I Never Knew Love Like This Before,” by Stephanie Mills, were monster smashes that have grown in stature to true classics.

The Queens, New York, born artist was obsessed with music of all kinds from childhood, and that impacted his expansive talent expressed in his work. He wrote, “At thirteen, I was jamming in small high school bands and listening to everything I could get my hands on. Psychedelic rock, funk, blues, jazz rock, soul, folk rock, you name it, I was into it. The sixties in NYC was a mecca for live music, and from the Fillmore to Central Park to Woodstock to the clubs in Greenwich Village, I was there.” By age 17, he was working in “Me and Mrs. Jones” singer Billy Paul’s band, and two years later joined the band of legendary jazz man Miles Davis. It was during a hiatus with Davis that Lucas was recruited by friend Mtume into Roberta Flack’s backing band, and when their historic musical collaboration began.

Lucas also produced Madonna’s debut album and wrote her #1 hit “Borderline,” helping to launch one of the biggest stars of the latter 20th Century. He also worked with such acts as Lou Rawls, The Four Tops, Randy Crawford and more. He also formed the band Sunfire, which had a brief recording career in the 1980s.

When a musical giant like Lucas dies at an age when many are still vibrant, it is always sad. But Reggie Lucas created so many happy moments for soul and pop music fans, that his work will be celebrated long after the sadness of today ends. Rest in peace, Mr. Lucas.

 

Source:  SoulTracks

White Thugs Brawl At A ‘Cornhole Tournament’ And No One Calls The Cops

IntroThe cops are called on Black folks while sitting at Starbucks, eating at Applebee’s, trying to work out at LA Fitness, leaving an Airbnb, sleeping at Yale and just living life. Since it’s clear that some White people are using 911 as a weapon, it is notable to point out when White folks actually deserve the cops called on them—and nothing happens. Even times when they create a savage brawl that is caught on video.

Cornhole Tournament – or bean bag toss is a lawn game in which players take turns throwing bags of corn at a raised platform with a hole in the far end. A bag in the hole scores 3 points, while one on the platform scores 1 point. Play continues until a team or player reaches the score of 21.

Thugsa violent person, especially a criminal.

  • Last week, a pack of white savages in Douglas County, Georgia got into a brawl at a cornhole tournament, which is a bean bag toss game. They were publicly intoxicated and wildly beating each other.

Savage (of an animal or force of nature) fierce, violent, and uncontrolled.(of an animal or force of nature) fierce, violent, and uncontrolled.

Douglas County Georgia – Things to Do

Take a Hike 
Coffee County has some of the most beautiful land in Georgia! Take a guided tour of the Broxton Rocks, which was named one of 30 Natural Wonders in Georgia to See Before You Die by the Atlanta-Journal Constitution and one of Georgia’s Hidden Treasures by WSB-TV. Stroll down the nature trails at General Coffee State Park and follow the trail of the rare gopher tortoise.

Grab a Bite or Bag a Deal
Eat Fresh, Eat Local!  We’ve got what your taste buds are looking for – all kinds of food, just like Grandma used to make. Farm fresh products are available at the Coffee County Farmer’s Curb Market,
Red Brick Farm or Deep South Growers.  Not interested in the food? Grab a deal at one of our many local specialty and national chain retail stores. Our historic downtown is known for unusual products, boutiques, and antiques.

Get Back to Basics
Opportunities to hunt, fish, ride, or just relax abound in our community!

Step Back in Time
We have two museums in Coffee County to spark your interest. These museums feature everything from railroads to agricultural and WWII aviation history. Also, anyone interested in genealogy will enjoy the Douglas City Cemeteries and other historic church and family cemeteries throughout the area.

The police were not called for the following reasons:

  1. There were no #thugs on the field.
  2. There were no Black folk there to call the police
  3. They displayed regular consistent behavior for Bag Throwing Tournament in Georgia
  4. No one was alarmed or afraid of their behavior.

 

Note:   Based on the intro it would lead one to believe that white folk are always calling the police on non-violent innocent Black folk (which is not true)!

Source: WordPress.com

Source :   Things to do in Douglas County Georgia

 

#HappyMothersDay

Unlike Josephine Baker, she did not s survive the 1917 riots in East St. Louis, Illinois, and ran away a few years later at age thirteen and began dancing in vaudeville and on Broadway. Alternatively, in 1925, she did not go to Paris where, after the jazz revue La Revue Nègre failed, her comic ability and jazz dancing drew the attention of the director of the Folies Bergère to later became one of the best-known entertainers in both France and much of Europe.

 

via #HappyMothersDay

#HappyMothersDay

smartselectimage_2016-08-08-01-20-11.pngUnlike Josephine Baker, she did not s survive the 1917 riots in East St. Louis, Illinois, and ran away a few years later at age thirteen and began dancing in vaudeville and on Broadway. Alternatively, in 1925, she did not go to Paris where, after the jazz revue La Revue Nègre failed, her comic ability and jazz dancing drew the attention of the director of the Folies Bergère to later became one of the best-known entertainers in both France and much of Europe.

She didn’t grow up in a shotgun home shared by 13 people, and her voice doesn’t captivate audiences and move people to want salvation like Mahalia Jackson.  No at age 12 her voice wasn’t heard all the way to end of the block.

Her passion was not promoting injustice as a radical black activist and philosopher.  She was arrested as a conspirator attempting to free George Jackson.  She never maintained an arsenal of registered guns, she did always have a blue box of Argo starch in the cabinet by the door in the kitchen.  She would not have run for the Communist Party VP seat.  She didn’t use her voice in place people would only speak about in the comfort of their dining rooms.  That was not her story.

Her wall was not filled with books and famous artists.  Intellectuals didn’t meet regularly at her home where Anderson, Nash, and Bennett urged Charles Johnson to organize, that W.E.B. DuBois, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullin, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and others essentially began the movement called the Harlem Renaissance with readings and speeches. No that was not here story, but she had keen ability to read you your rights if she felt moved to do so.

You won’t find her name among Mrs. D. J. Dupuy, Ms. Georgia M. Johnson, Mrs. H. W. Johnson and others who ran branches of the NAACP during World War II.

She was a mother of 3, a grandmother, someone’s daughter, aunt, sister and a wife to the illustrious Robert Hughes Williamson.  She was always present, she was not the owner of Castle, but her home was her castle filled with everything needed to manage a home worthy of its definition.  Trials and tribulation were not uncommon, and neither was perseverance.  She was not wealthy by most standards, but her children had the best and not one day in 54 years did they ever go hungry, without shelter, without scolding, without love. Punishments varied from the inability to use to phone to the driving the car.  If you looking for “Susie Homemaker” you in the wrong story if you’re looking to have your faults minimized you’re on the wrong LifeTime channel.  If you looking for someone to pick you every time you fell you are so far from the River of Denial.  If you want to have lived a life that echoes “get up and move on”, “find a way to make it work”.  If you’re looking warm and fuzzy – you’ll find it in the Cheeseburger Pie.  Watch her face as she makes it, listen as she talks about it, watch her as she slices it and delivers it to those around her…there you will find all the love you need.  Who’s is this woman she’s my mother Nettie Williamson – Happy Valentines Day.

Sources: Sartain, Lee. Invisible Activists: Women of the Louisiana NAACP and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1915–1945 (1). Baton Rouge, US: LSU Press, 2007. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 14 February 2017.

Copyright © 2007. LSU Press. All rights reserved.

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Understanding #JCPOA & The Consequences

 

With President Donald Trump’s decision Tuesday to withdraw the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal, we thought a quick guide to the international agreement might be helpful.Who is involved?: Iran made the agreement with six countries — the U.S., U.K., Russia, France, China, Germany — and the European Union.

What does the deal do, in one sentence? The deal lifted sanctions on Iran in exchange for stricter limits on Iran’s nuclear energy and enrichment programs.

How about some more specifics? Iran agreed to cut the number of its centrifuges in operation. (They can be used to enrich nuclear material to weapons-grade levels.) Leaders in Tehran also agreed to reduce the country’s stockpile of uranium, and redesign a specific facility so it cannot produce plutonium that could be used in a nuclear bomb. Finally, as part of the deal, Iran must give international inspectors access to facilities within 24 days of a request by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Timeline: Iran agreed to abide by these provisions for at least eight years. Some parts of the deal last 10, 15 or 25 years.

What if Iran violates the deal?: Sanctions against Iran would automatically “snap back” into place for 10 years.

France –  stands to lose significant business dealings with Iran as a result of the reinstated sanctions.  Losing deals to provide 100 new Airbus airliners, and opening a $5bn oil exploration project with Iran means real world economic consequences for a close ally of the United States.

Mike Pompeo –   Secretary of State   now has his work cut out for him. He must navigate the anger from Europe and Russia, while convincing North Korea that America will honour the deal they are currently negotiating.

What does the nuclear deal have to do with the oil price? – When Iran pledged to limit its nuclear ambitions to civil energy production under the deal with the P5+1 group of world powers – the US, UK, France, China, Russia and Germany – sanctions were lifted on its oil exports, giving a significant boost to global oil supplies.

What is Trump’s role?: Under U.S. law, every 90 days the president must certify that Iran is complying with the agreement. Trump did that twice, and then he decertified it in October. The larger decisions were whether to pull the United States out of the deal and/or reimpose sanctions.

Consequences: The deal, called a “framework” agreement, is officially known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA.  President Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the Iran nuclear deal has other consequ

1) It greatly undermines U.S. national interests by eroding its credibility, by splitting the United States from its European allies and the international community, by upending an agreement that effectively blocked Iran’s nuclear aspirations at the weapons level, and by wasting billions of dollars of political, financial, and human capital the United States invested to reach the JCPOA.

2) It erodes the pillars of the rules-based international system as it questions the independent power and diplomatic credibility of European states, especially if they are not able to safeguard the deal from American violations. Likewise, Trump’s decision undermines the value and significance of multilateralism and international institutions, especially those operating towards the global nuclear non-proliferation regime such as the IAEA.

3) it marks a turning point in the post-revolutionary history of modern Iran as the first major bitter experience of the country’s youth with the United States and the first direct public negotiation with America–inflaming Iranian nationalism, undermining the value of engaging the West, and shifting the domestic discourse to a hardline position. This was a gift to Ayatollah Khamenei as it undermines the platform of moderate President Rouhani, claiming he was right to tell everyone not to trust the Americans. Now Khamenei will turn to undermine the credibility of the Europeans by turning all eyes on the EU powers, before Iran uses the U.S. violation and withdrawal of the agreement to move beyond the deal.

Source:   By Lisa Desjardins, Getty Images, Harvard Kennedy School

Did You Know

The Beatles held the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100 for 3 and half months longer than any other group with the song, “I Wanna Hold Your Hand”.  Guess who broke the record?

 

 

On May 9, 1964, the Great Louis Armstrong, age 63, broke the Beatles’ stranglehold on the U.S. pop charts with the #1 hit “Hello Dolly.”