#Goodnight George #Bush

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George H.W. Bush, who died on Nov. 30, 2018 at the age of 94, lived a long and remarkable life, serving as the nation’s 41st president and raising its 43rd. He also spent 73 of his 94 years married to his wife, Barbara, before her death in April.

But his entire future — including becoming president — was threatened in 1944, when Bush was just 20 years old and serving as a flying officer for the Navy during WWII, according to biographer Jon Meacham, who wrote Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush. During a planned strike on the Japanese island of Chichi Jima, Meacham wrote, Bush’s plane was hit, forcing him to steer through smoke and flames before parachuting out of the aircraft. He bobbed in the water for hours, injured but evading capture by the Japanese, before eventually being rescued by a U.S. submarine.
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#Goodnight Dr. Olivia Hooker, Tulsa Race Massacre Survivor And Minority Trailblazer, Dies At 103

By Bob Collins Eagle Guest Writer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjP-IeA-K1E WHITE PLAINS, New York – Dr. Olivia J. Hooker, a survivor of the Tulsa Race Massacre, has passed away, her goddaughter Janis confirmed. Janis said Dr. Hooker passed away at her home in White Plains, New York Wednesday, Nov.21, and she will be buried in New York. In 1945, Olivia Hooker became the first African-American to join the U.S. Coast Guard. She later earned a doctorate degree in psychology and became a professor at Fordham University. And she is said to be the last survivor of the infamous burning of “Black Wall Street” in Tulsa, Okla., although there was some dispute about that fact earlier this year when NPR ran a story about her. “My father’s store was destroyed,” Hooker told Radio Diaries. “There was nothing left but one big safe. It was so big they couldn’t carry it away, so they had to leave it — in the middle of the rubble.” The Burning of Black Wall Street in 1921 is considered one of the worst racial atrocities in American history, although it was rarely taught in any history class. Over two days, 300 African Americans were killed. She campaigned to allow black women into the military, but then she was frustrated that nobody was joining. “If I go and I survive, maybe someone else will come,” she said. So she tried to join the Navy but was refused on “a technicality” that was never revealed to her. She joined the Coast Guard Semper Paratus “Always Ready” (SPARs) instead in 1945. When the Coast Guard dedicated a wing of its training center in her honor, she shared her philosophy. “Love all, trust few, and do right.” Her death was announced by her nephew on a Facebook page dedicated to her.

Source: Dr. Olivia Hooker, Tulsa Race Massacre Survivor And Minority Trailblazer, Dies At 103

#Goodnight Reggie Lucas

(May 19, 2018) He was a Grammy-winning musician and a hitmaking songwriter and producer who spread a lot of joy over the years. We’re sad to report the death of Reggie Lucas, one of the great soul music songwriters and producers of the late 70s and early 80s, at age 65.

(May 19, 2018) He was a Grammy-winning musician and a hitmaking songwriter and producer who spread a lot of joy over the years. We’re sad to report the death of Reggie Lucas, one of the great soul music songwriters and producers of the late 70s and early 80s, at age 65.

Lucas’s daughter, Lisa (the head of the National Book Foundation), posted today on Facebook, “After a long and arduous struggle with his physical heart (his emotional one was perfect) he was called home. I wish he’d had more time, I wish we’d all had more time with him, but he left this world absolutely covered in love, with his hands held and his family beside him. I’m glad he’s at peace now.”

Along with songwriting partner James Mtume, Lucas wrote some of the classiest soul music songs of the late 70s, many of which helped the formation of the urban adult contemporary genre that would dominate a decade later. Hits like “The Closer I Get to You” by Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway, and “I Never Knew Love Like This Before,” by Stephanie Mills, were monster smashes that have grown in stature to true classics.

The Queens, New York, born artist was obsessed with music of all kinds from childhood, and that impacted his expansive talent expressed in his work. He wrote, “At thirteen, I was jamming in small high school bands and listening to everything I could get my hands on. Psychedelic rock, funk, blues, jazz rock, soul, folk rock, you name it, I was into it. The sixties in NYC was a mecca for live music, and from the Fillmore to Central Park to Woodstock to the clubs in Greenwich Village, I was there.” By age 17, he was working in “Me and Mrs. Jones” singer Billy Paul’s band, and two years later joined the band of legendary jazz man Miles Davis. It was during a hiatus with Davis that Lucas was recruited by friend Mtume into Roberta Flack’s backing band, and when their historic musical collaboration began.

Lucas also produced Madonna’s debut album and wrote her #1 hit “Borderline,” helping to launch one of the biggest stars of the latter 20th Century. He also worked with such acts as Lou Rawls, The Four Tops, Randy Crawford and more. He also formed the band Sunfire, which had a brief recording career in the 1980s.

When a musical giant like Lucas dies at an age when many are still vibrant, it is always sad. But Reggie Lucas created so many happy moments for soul and pop music fans, that his work will be celebrated long after the sadness of today ends. Rest in peace, Mr. Lucas.

Lucas’s daughter, Lisa (the head of the National Book Foundation), posted today on Facebook, “After a long and arduous struggle with his physical heart (his emotional one was perfect) he was called home. I wish he’d had more time, I wish we’d all had more time with him, but he left this world absolutely covered in love, with his hands held and his family beside him. I’m glad he’s at peace now.”

Along with songwriting partner James Mtume, Lucas wrote some of the classiest soul music songs of the late 70s, many of which helped the formation of the urban adult contemporary genre that would dominate a decade later. Hits like “The Closer I Get to You” by Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway, and “I Never Knew Love Like This Before,” by Stephanie Mills, were monster smashes that have grown in stature to true classics.

The Queens, New York, born artist was obsessed with music of all kinds from childhood, and that impacted his expansive talent expressed in his work. He wrote, “At thirteen, I was jamming in small high school bands and listening to everything I could get my hands on. Psychedelic rock, funk, blues, jazz rock, soul, folk rock, you name it, I was into it. The sixties in NYC was a mecca for live music, and from the Fillmore to Central Park to Woodstock to the clubs in Greenwich Village, I was there.” By age 17, he was working in “Me and Mrs. Jones” singer Billy Paul’s band, and two years later joined the band of legendary jazz man Miles Davis. It was during a hiatus with Davis that Lucas was recruited by friend Mtume into Roberta Flack’s backing band, and when their historic musical collaboration began.

Lucas also produced Madonna’s debut album and wrote her #1 hit “Borderline,” helping to launch one of the biggest stars of the latter 20th Century. He also worked with such acts as Lou Rawls, The Four Tops, Randy Crawford and more. He also formed the band Sunfire, which had a brief recording career in the 1980s.

When a musical giant like Lucas dies at an age when many are still vibrant, it is always sad. But Reggie Lucas created so many happy moments for soul and pop music fans, that his work will be celebrated long after the sadness of today ends. Rest in peace, Mr. Lucas.

 

Source:  SoulTracks

Good Night Stephen Hawking

 

Stephen Hawking is the former Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and author of A Brief History of Time which was an international bestseller. Now the Dennis Stanton Avery and Sally Tsui Wong-Avery Director of Research at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and Founder of the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at Cambridge, his other books for the general reader include A Briefer History of Time, the essay collection Black Holes and Baby Universe and The Universe in a Nutshell.

In 1963, Hawking contracted motor neurone disease and was given two years to live. Yet he went on to Cambridge to become a brilliant researcher and Professorial Fellow at Gonville and Caius College. From 1979 to 2009 he held the post of Lucasian Professor at Cambridge, the chair held by Isaac Newton in 1663. Professor Hawking has over a dozen honorary degrees and was awarded the CBE in 1982. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and a member of the US National Academy of Science. Stephen Hawking is regarded as one of the most brilliant theoretical physicists since Einstein.Steven Hawking