Addiction, Black Lives Matter, Faith, Judging, Law Enforcement, Prison Reform, Redemption

#KennethFoster #Deathrow #Inmate – A Story of #Redemption

Death Row and Redemption – Kenneth Foster Jr

One night in August of 1996, four black men were arrested in connection to the shooting of Michael Lahood Jr., a white 26-year-old San Antonio law student. They were also found guilty of two robberies that took place hours before the event that changed many lives forever.

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Connecticut, Law Enforcement

#PSA Connecticut The Worst #Drivers

It’s Friday morning, I’m tired but it’s the last day of the work week, think I’ll hit the snooze button 3 more times.  Oh no!!! I’m late…

I’m annoyed my husband forgot to get my suit out the cleaners – now what am I going to wear to the interview – I have to prepare something else – that’s going to make me late…

I hate driving 45 minutes to work on Monday – there so much traffic…

I’m a risk taker – I want to drive my Toyota Celica like a BMW 750 along the highway…

I need to get through all this traffic, what can I do?

  1. Don’t let anyone in on the highway;
  2. Jump lanes through traffic all the way to work on a 2 lane highway;
  3. Pump  my brakes because the idiot behind me is getting on my nerves;
  4. Speed up cut the other off from the 3 lane so I can get off the VERY next exit;
  5. Drive behind you at very close range in the dark with SUV so I can blind the driver in front of me, in hopes they will move out of MY way;
  6. Don’t use my signal light so I can take the lead because other drivers won’t know what my intent is;
  7. Blow my horn like a maniac because you’re in my way;
  8. Run that yellow light (by making a turn)  after it turns red and hold up the other drivers with a green light;
  9. If you’re in my blind spot – so what – that’s why it called a #BlindSpot ;
  10. I need to call my daughter and tell her to wait at school I’m running late – while I’m traveling at 55 mph on the highway;

On April 28, 2017 — A new survey found Connecticut among the worst drivers in the nation.  Insurance company, EverDrive, ranked the best and worst across the U.S. and found that Connecticut ranked number 49 out of 50.

On January 28, 2018 – Financial site WalletHub analyzed driving conditions in each of the 50 states to find out which states have the best and worst commutes. The site looked at a variety of factors like road conditions, average gas prices and share of rush-hour traffic congestion.  Connecticut did not fare well; according to this report, the state is the fifth worst for drivers.

At the end of the day we all want to go home safely…

View Crazy Driving Here

 

Source – Fox 61
Source – CT Post

Government, Gun Control, Law Enforcement, Reading, Real Talk

#GunControl – The Real Story

Fallacy – a mistaken belief, especially one based on unsound argument

Gun Control – is an illusion the moment it is thought of.  Having the ability to control guns is a fallacy delivered to the residents of the United States by law makers and lobbyist to appease those for it and those against it.  The deception of gun control that has caused families harmed at the hand of a gun man to actually think a loved one’s death was not in vain if measures are taken.  It is an illusion meticulously crafted by the tempter.  Gun control like a paradox – in Hamlet – I must be cruel to be kind.  Gun ControlInterestingly the bias for gun control is based solely on the group’s interest at the moment – a tragedy occurs.  The attempt to control guns by congress and other DC based groups is the most deceitful casuistry and subterfuge of the 21st century in front of American citizens who are looking for answers albeit in the wrong place.  We won’t find solace and comfort for our loved ones who have been shot at the hands of a random gunman.  Congress and other on the [Hill] have no experience in helping those in pain.  For this type of pain we must look to a force that is greater than congress, picket signs and petitions.  We must look to Alpha and Omega, may you find Him now.

Black Lives Matter, Daily Prompt, Law Enforcement, Reading, Social Injustice

Daily Prompt: Captivating

An excerpt from the writer known as Rhacky8

As I read the last paragraph the writer’s post – I was captivated…

…More than ten years past, with an ailing economy, a jobless youth that would rather commit crime than work, an abusive police force that that rewards hooliganism and kidnaps children for the crimes of their parents, and a legislature dominated by greedy individuals representing themselves in parliament and the government still celebrates to the victories of the early 2000s, it is then safe to ask what independence are we celebrating?

While thinking about the past and recent articles about police brutality and shooting of unarmed men I decided to do a quick search on “abusive police force” and here is an excerpt of what I found to be captivating reading:

Self-efficacy is an important aspect of social learning. If a person believes that they are capable of carrying out the behaviour which they have observed and that they are likely to achieve the desired result, then the aggressive act is more likely to be imitated. This helps to explain individual differences in behaviour. It also explains why an individual will behaviour aggressively in one situation where they feel confident of success and not in another where the chances of success are less likely.

When viewing the video clips on social media of police officers beating and beating and beating a man while he’s on the ground screaming in terror, I often think to myself,  what does it look and sound like to the police officer – what are the other officers who are not engaged in the beating thinking or feeling?  What does it mean to be subdued – (when did the definition change), what is their definition of “enough is enough” does the screaming of the [victim] matter (apparently not), does crowd influence the officer to either keep striking or surrender his baton? Do you remember the Rodney King beating!

Albeit Bandura’s piece speaks specifically to children however,  I would bet the farm that the police officers who have and will in the future display aggression towards another individual in the manner they displayed with Rodney King were once children too – that thought is most assuredly – Captivating!

You shall not mistreat any widow or fatherless child.

Woe to those who decree iniquitous decrees, and the writers who keep writing oppression,  to turn aside the needy from justice and to rob the poor of my people of their right, that widows may be their spoil, and that they may make the fatherless their prey!

 

Source:  Bandura, Albert. “Social learning theory of aggression.” Journal of communication 28.3 (1978): 12-29.

via Daily Prompt: Believe

via Daily Prompt: Captivated

Faith, Law Enforcement, Politics, Spirituality, The Word, Tolerance, Veterans

#FloridaShooting I’d Run #POTUS

Words spoken by your President – Donald Trump

“You don’t know until you test it, but I think, I really believe I would have run in there even if I didn’t have weapon.” stated Trump.  The same one who thinks:

1. “We’re not bombing. We’re not doing much. We have a president that thinks ISIS has been contained. We have a president that doesn’t know what’s happening. So when you say we’re bombing, we’re not bombing.”

2. The Generals have been reduced to rubble…They have been reduced to a point where it’s embarrassing to our country…

3. “The other thing with the terrorists is you have to take out their families, when you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families. They care about their lives, don’t kid yourself. When they say they don’t care about their lives, you have to take out their families.”

4. “Torture works. Ok, folks?” You know, I have these guys – ‘Torture doesn’t work!’ – believe me, it works. And waterboarding is your minor form. Some people say it’s not actually torture. Let’s assume it is. But they asked me the question, ‘What do you think of waterboarding?’ Absolutely fine. But we should go much stronger than waterboarding.

5. “It is always a great honor to be so nicely complimented by a man so highly respected within his own country and beyond.” (regarding Vladimir Putin

6. “Donald J. Trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on.”

7.  “…My primary consultant is myself, and I have a good instinct for this stuff”

8.  “These people are cowards. They’re not going to walk into a school if 20% of the teachers have guns — it may be 10% or may be 40%. And what I’d recommend doing is the people that do carry, we give them a bonus. We give them a little bit of a bonus,” Trump said. “They’ll frankly feel more comfortable having the gun anyway. But you give them a little bit of a bonus.”

9. “I’m very pro-choice,” Trump says. “I hate the concept of abortion. I hate it. I hate everything it stands for. I cringe when I listen to people debating the subject. But you still — I just believe in choice.” Later in an interview with Tapper –

TAPPER: Let me ask you about a few social issues because they haven’t been issues you have been talking about for several years. I know you’re opposed to abortion.

TRUMP: Right. I’m pro-choice.

TAPPER: You’re pro-choice or pro-life?

TRUMP: I’m pro-life. I’m sorry.

What am I #Concerned about:  I must  ask myself what would I do, I ponder what would have President Obama done.  Who are “these” people he is referring to, did you know more than one-third of the shootings—34 percent—involved a shooter who was prohibited from possessing firearms?

If teachers get bonuses for carrying a weapon what will substitutes get considering a teacher‘s salary average about 3 times as much?  Will Substitutes be required to carry a weapon, if we can’t control the women and men who are having relationships with children how will we manage the emotions of adults with weapons in certain school districts?

10. “Two Corinthians, 3:17, that’s the whole ballgame,” Trump said. (The relevant verse: “Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom.”)

I do not believe the Spirit of the Lord resides (with Trump at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC) however I do believe that God is not foolish and would not leave us nor forsake us.  I remember another instance where all went awry for a man named Job and He stood on what he knew to be true, regardless of what his friends and family thought.  Job was victorious and I am 1000% sure we can and will be victorious through these difficult times as well.

Source:  Thirdway.com By Sanaa Khan
Source:  CNN
Source:  The Federalist
Source:  The Washington Post
Source:  Teacher Portal
Source Everytown Analysis

 

 

Black Lives Matter, Community, Law Enforcement, Social Injustice

#FreeSpeech #Kaepernick

Freedom of speech

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

First is the matter of racial equality. When slavery was abolished, it was not by constitutional fiat but by the joining of military necessity with the moral force of a great antislavery movement, acting outside the Constitution and often against the law. The Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments wrote into the Constitution rights that extralegal action had already won. But the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments were ignored for almost a hundred years. The right to equal protection of the law and the right to vote, even the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 underlining the meaning of the equal protection clause, did not become operative until blacks, in the fifteen years following the Montgomery bus boycott, shook up the nation by tumultuous actions inside and outside the law.

The Constitution played a helpful but marginal role in all that. Black people, in the political context of the 1960s, would have demanded equality whether or not the Constitution called for it, just as the antislavery movement demanded abolition even in the absence of constitutional support.
What about the most vaunted of constitutional rights, free speech? Historically, the Supreme Court has given the right to free speech only shaky support, seesawing erratically by sometimes affirming and sometimes overriding restrictions. Whatever a distant Court decided, the real right of citizens to free expression has been determined by the immediate power of the local police on the street, by the employer in the workplace and by the financial limits on the ability to use the mass media.

The existence of a First Amendment has been inspirational but its protection elusive. Its reality has depended on the willingness of citizens, whether labor organizers, socialists or Jehovah’s Witnesses, to insist on their right to speak and write. Liberties have not been given; they have been taken. And whether in the future we have a right to say what we want, or air what we say, will be determined not by the existence of the First Amendment or the latest Supreme Court decision but by whether we are courageous enough to speak up at the risk of being jailed or fired, organized enough to defend our speech against official interference and can command resources enough to get our ideas before a reasonably large public.
The language of the First Amendment looks absolute. “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech.” Yet in 1798, seven years after the First Amendment was adopted, Congress did exactly that, it passed laws abridging the freedom of speech-the Alien and Sedition Acts.

The powerful words of the First Amendment seem to fade with the sounds of war, or near war. The Sedition Act of 1798 expired, but in 1917 when the United States entered World War I, Congress passed another law in direct contradiction of the amendment’s command that “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.” This was the Espionage Act of 1917.

“The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect a man in falsely shouting fire in a theater and causing a panic…. The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.”
… the national government can restrict freedom of speech in relation to foreign policy, through judicial reinterpretations of the First Amendment. But what about state laws restricting freedom of speech or press? For over a century, the First Amendment simply did not apply to the states, because it says, ”Congress shall make no law.” The states could make whatever laws they wanted.

Four years later, however, when a group of people were arrested in a shopping mall for distributing leaflets against the Vietnam War, the Court said they were properly arrested. What was the difference between this case and the other? The union people, the Court said, were expressing themselves about an issue connected with the shopping center. But the Vietnam War had nothing to do with the shopping center, so those people had no First Amendment right to express themselves.’ Much like the kneeling – which is directed towards police brutality of African American folk, yet the anthem, the flag nor football has any connection with police brutality.
The point in all this recounting of cases is that citizens cannot depend on the First Amendment, as interpreted by the courts, to protect freedom of expression. One year the Court will declare, with inspiring words, the right of persons to speak or write as they wish. The next year they will take away that right.

A young black man named Charles MacLaurin learned this by hard experience in the year 1963. That summer, he addressed a group of fifty black people in front of the courthouse in Greenville, Mississippi, protesting the arrest of several young black people who had been demonstrating against racial segregation. It was a peaceful meeting, in which MacLaunn criticized the conviction and urged that blacks register to vote to deal with such injustices. A police officer told McLaurin to move on. He said he had a right to speak and continued. He was arrested, charged with disturbing the peace and resisting arrest, found guilty by the local court, sentenced to six months in jail, and this was affirmed by the Mississippi Supreme Court.
When he appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, he discovered the rule that most citizens (who grow up hearing again and again from some aggrieved person: “I’ll take this to the Supreme Court!”) don’t know: Four of the nine justices must agree to take a case (in technical terms, to grant certiorari). Only three Supreme Court justices voted to take MacLaurin’s case. By now, it was 1967, and so, four years after his conviction, he went to prison.

An even more serious problem with the First Amendment is that most situations involving freedom of expression never make it into the courts. How many people are willing or able to hire a lawyer, spend thousands of dollars, and wait several years to get a possible favorable decision in court? That means that the right of free speech is left largely in the hands of local police. What are policemen likely to be most respectful of-the Constitution, or their own “police powers”?

This is always the price of liberty-taking the risk of going to jail, of being beaten and perhaps being killed.

Source Howard Zinn

Community, Law Enforcement, Mental Health, Politics, Prison Reform

Should #Prisoners Be Allowed To Vote?

If the rule is: If you know right from wrong, you go to jail. If you don’t,  you go to a mental institution.

If that be true: Prisoners have chosen to do wrong

Why is the government giving some prisoners the vote, in the UK this option was reviewed. 

Having initially said prisoners serving up to four years would get the vote, ministers now plan to give the vote to only those prisoners sentenced to serve a year or less. However, they are aware this policy will be tested in the courts and they might lose again.

Why only up to 4 years? Let’s suppose this was the USA, I don’t know but are the Electoral votes comprised of all residents? 

Prisoners are counted at the location of the prison. However, I would suspect they are released to their hometown.

What are your thoughts. 

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-11674014

Community, Law Enforcement

How Connecticut became a model for prison reform

Behind the walls of the Osborn Correctional Institution stands a laboratory for one of the most aggressive experiments in criminal justice reform currently underway in the United States. Under the stewardship of Gov. Dannel Malloy, a Democrat, Connecticut has seen its prison population fall to a 20-year low, while rates of reported violent crime have plummeted.

Source: How Connecticut became a model for prison reform

Afro American Leaders, Black Lives Matter, Law Enforcement

Baltimore City State’s Attorney

mosby

Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby gave a blistering speech Wednesday which explains why it is near impossible to convict police officers in this country.

In her speech, Mosby said she took an oath to “never cower” from cases where she believes she has probable cause. The case of Freddie Gray, whose spine was somehow severed in a police van, leading to his death, was one such cas

Mosby’s prosecution of the police officers involved in Gray’s death, however, saw no convictions. During Mosby’s twelve minute press conference, she lays out a stunning indictment against Baltimore police in explaining why the prosecutions imploded.

“There was a reluctance and obvious bias that was consistently exemplified, not by the entire Baltimore Police Department, but by individuals within the Baltimore Police Department at every stage of the investigation, which became blatantly apparent in the subsequent trial,” said Mosby.

“There were individual police officers who were witnesses to the case, yet were part of the investigative team,” said Mosby in a bombshell revelation. “Interrogations that were conducted without asking the most poignant questions, lead investigators that were totally uncooperative and started a counter-investigation to disprove the state’s case by not executing search warrants pertaining to text messages among the police officers involved in the case.”

Mosby also accused police investigators of “creating videos to disprove the state’s case, creating notes that were drafted after the case was launched to contradict the medial examiner’s conclusion.” She then accused the investigating officers of turning over these notes to the defense “months prior” to turning them over to the prosecution.

“We’ve all bore witness to an inherent bias that is the direct result of when police police themselves,” Mosby concluded.

Mosby revealed that she’d previously not been allowed to speak on the case due to a gag order.

Comments:  Now that we know this information what’s next, as an African American woman did her desire to maintain her job preclude her from exorcising ANY moral and/or integrity as a Black Woman in this day and time to providing disclosure before the verdict was submitted?

Watch the video below:

Mosby Press Conference

Story by: Naturally Moi

 

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