Politics, Prison Reform, Veterans

Homes For The Brave Helping #Homeless #Veterans

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Addiction, Black Lives Matter, Faith, Judging, Law Enforcement, Prison Reform, Redemption

#KennethFoster #Deathrow #Inmate – A Story of #Redemption

Death Row and Redemption – Kenneth Foster Jr

One night in August of 1996, four black men were arrested in connection to the shooting of Michael Lahood Jr., a white 26-year-old San Antonio law student. They were also found guilty of two robberies that took place hours before the event that changed many lives forever.

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Prison Reform, Reading

#Hernandez’s 2013 Murder Conviction – Vacated

Judge agrees to erase ex-NFL star Aaron Hernandez’s conviction in 2013 murder because he died before the appeal was heard.

The former New England Patriots tight end hanged himself in his prison cell last month while serving a life sentence in the killing of semi-professional football player Odin Lloyd.

Patrick Bomberg said Hernandez “should not be able to accomplish in death what he could not accomplish in life.”

Hernandez’s appellate attorney told the judge that the state’s highest court has applied the legal doctrine “without exception,” even in cases of suicide.

After hearing arguments from both sides, Judge Susan Garsh said she expects to issue a decision late Tuesday morning.

Source: ESPN.com

Bible, Prison Reform

#Arkansas #Midazolam

Folk take drugs for one reason or another i.e. medical or recreational. Physicians prescribe drugs for medical reasons and/or  for addicts who must get their fix and they want it  “legally”.  What happens when a Pharmacy does not have the prescribed drug or the Drug Dealer runs out of his/her “product” – very simply the consumer drives or walks to another pharmacy and the same thing for the addict on the street, not a situation in the world that will stop an addict from copping cocaine, heroin or any other pharmaceutical should the #monkey call.

Midazolam may cause severe breathing problems (eg, respiratory depression, respiratory arrest), especially when used for sedation in noncritical care settings. Respiratory depression and respiratory arrest could result in brain damage or death if not treated properly. Midazolam should only be used under appropriate close medical supervision.

Midazolam is used for – Reducing anxiety or producing drowsiness or anesthesia before certain medical procedures or surgery. It may also be given continuously to maintain sedation or anesthesia in certain patients. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Midazolam is a #benzodiazepine. It works in the central nervous system (brain) to cause sleepiness, muscle relaxation, and short-term memory loss, and to reduce anxiety.

In a story by Alan Blinder in the New York Times – The chemist Armin Walser who helped invent the sedative coupled with the fact that in Arkansas, a prisoner has not been put to death since November 2005 what is all  the hoopla about now?

Midazolam is planned as the first of three drugs in the state’s lethal injections. The drug is intended to render a prisoner unconscious and keep him from experiencing pain later in the execution, when other drugs are administered to stop the breathing and heart. Why not obtain a comparable drug that provides the same effect at a LOWER COST!? Walgreens midazolam 1 bottle (118ml) 2mg/ml syrup $ 90.38.

Supreme Court – In a 5-to-4 vote, the court ruled that using midazolam does not violate the Eighth Amendment, which prohibits “cruel and unusual punishment.” In executions, the drug has been used to induce unconsciousness before other drugs are administered to stop an inmate’s breathing and stop the heart.

Midazolam Gone Wrong – Dennis McGuire, convicted of the rape and murder of a pregnant woman in 1989, was executed  in Ohio using a combination of two drugs that had never before been used in an execution. Attorneys for McGuire and medical experts argued that the use of the drugs represented an unconstitutional, “cruel and unusual” execution, because of the possibility that McGuire would be conscious and in pain as he died.  “Ohio is taking drugs that are normally used for things like a colonoscopy, and they’re giving massive overdoses to kill people,”

Arkansas has executed Ledell Lee, the state’s first inmate to be put to death since 2005, for a 1993 murder. Lee was one of eight death row inmates Arkansas had planned to execute by April 30, the day before the state’s supply of the lethal injection drug midazolam expires.

Lastly some argue that Jesus confirmed capital punishment and even His death on the cross confirms the belief that death for death is acceptable and appropriate.  I on the other hand have this to say… Jesus did NOT die on the cross and He was hung for a crime that He had NOT committed and it was most assuredly cruel and unusual punishment.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/04/21/arkansas-prepares-to-carry-out-first-execution-since-2005.html

Prison Reform

Should #Prisoners Be Allowed To Vote?

MsConcerned's Manifesto

If the rule is: If you know right from wrong, you go to jail. If you don’t,  you go to a mental institution.

If that be true: Prisoners have chosen to do wrong

Why is the government giving some prisoners the vote, in the UK this option was reviewed. 

Having initially said prisoners serving up to four years would get the vote, ministers now plan to give the vote to only those prisoners sentenced to serve a year or less. However, they are aware this policy will be tested in the courts and they might lose again.

Why only up to 4 years? Let’s suppose this was the USA, I don’t know but are the Electoral votes comprised of all residents? 

Prisoners are counted at the location of the prison. However, I would suspect they are released to their hometown.

What are your thoughts. 

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-11674014

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Community, Law Enforcement, Mental Health, Politics, Prison Reform

Should #Prisoners Be Allowed To Vote?

If the rule is: If you know right from wrong, you go to jail. If you don’t,  you go to a mental institution.

If that be true: Prisoners have chosen to do wrong

Why is the government giving some prisoners the vote, in the UK this option was reviewed. 

Having initially said prisoners serving up to four years would get the vote, ministers now plan to give the vote to only those prisoners sentenced to serve a year or less. However, they are aware this policy will be tested in the courts and they might lose again.

Why only up to 4 years? Let’s suppose this was the USA, I don’t know but are the Electoral votes comprised of all residents? 

Prisoners are counted at the location of the prison. However, I would suspect they are released to their hometown.

What are your thoughts. 

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-11674014

Prison Reform

From One #Prison to Another

Angela Davis - Are Prisons Obsolete
Angela Davis – Are Prisons Obsolete

 

  • Adult correctional systems supervised an estimated 6,851,000 persons at yearend 2014, about 52,200 fewer offenders than at yearend 2013.
  • About 1 in 36 adults (or 2.8% of adults in the United States) was under some form of correctional supervision at yearend 2014

Why is this so important today, because when one woman can not find services for one inmate soon to be released from prison, the thought of a revolving door begins to frame her thoughts as the horrid smell of fear invades not only her mind but those of the inmate’s family.  Incarceration is not only to ensure the safety of #JoePublic but it divides the individuals of the families associated with the inmate, it has never been a deterrent to crime or the facilitator of “changed behavior” considering there are only 2 options; (1) go to jail; or (2) go to jail and be locked up within the facility for 23 hours a day.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics
Source: “Are Prisons Obsolete”, Angela Davis

 

 

Healthcare, Mental Health, Prison Reform, Tolerance

Is Providing Access to Healthcare After Release from Prison Enough?

Mental Health Care in Jail

Is Providing Access to Healthcare After Release from Prison Enough?

Providing health care after release is a great program, however, most mental illness requires constant review, which does not occur inside the prison walls.  Alana Horowitz Satlin wrote in the Huffington Post, “A 2006 study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that over half of all jail and prison inmates have mental health issues; an estimated 1.25 million suffered from mental illness, over four times the number in 1998. Research suggests that people with mental illness are overrepresented in the criminal justice system by rates of two to four times the normal population. The severity of these illnesses vary, but advocates say that one factor remains steady: with proper treatment, many of these incarcerations could have been avoided.”

Connecticut’s Department of Correction’s Disclaimer reads: “The Department of Correction provides comprehensive health care to the offender population that meets a community standard of care, and includes medical, mental health, dental, addiction and ancillary services, in compliance with applicable state and federal laws and consent decrees. This spectrum of health care is carried out through a partnership the Department has established with the services of the University of Connecticut, Correctional Managed Health Care.”

Suicide Prevention

NCIA’s analysis found that only three departments of correction (California, Delaware, and Louisiana) had suicide prevention policies that addressed all six critical components and that an additional five departments of correction (Connecticut, Hawaii, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania) had policies that addressed all but one critical component.  Thus, only 15 percent of all departments of correction had policies that contained either all or all but one critical component of suicide prevention.  In contrast, 14 departments of correction (27%) had either no suicide prevention policies or limited policies — 3 with none, and 11 with policies that addressed only one or two critical components.  The majority (58%) of DOCs had policies that contained three or four of the critical components.

Medicaid Enrollment for Prisoners

Administration officials moved to improve low Medicaid enrollment for emerging prisoners, urging states to start signups before release and expanding eligibility to thousands of former inmates in halfway houses near the end of their sentences.

Health coverage for ex-inmates “is critical to our goal of reducing recidivism and promoting the public health,” said Richard Frank, assistant secretary for planning for the Department of Health and Human Services.

Advocates praised the changes but cautioned that HHS and states are still far from ensuring that most people leaving prisons and jails are put on Medicaid and get access to treatment.

“It’s highly variable. Some states and jurisdictions are having a lot of success” enrolling ex-prisoners, said Kamala Mallik-Kane, a researcher at the Urban Institute who has studied the process. “Others of them have initiatives in place that aren’t reaching the kinds of numbers that are making a dent.”

The 2010 health law made nearly all ex-prisoners eligible for Medicaid in states that chose to expand the state and federal insurance program for the poor. Many welcomed the chance to cover a group with high rates of chronic disease, mental illness and substance abuse problems.

But prisons and jails, burdened with ineffective computers, understaffing and complicated Medicaid enrollment procedures, have been slow to sign up released inmates.

Federal and state prisons let out more than 600,000 people a year. Millions more cycle through jails. But a study published in Health Affairs found prisons and jails nationwide enrolled only 112,520 emerging inmates between late 2013 up to January 2015.

Much of HHS’ guidance repeats existing policy, reminding states that those on probation or parole are eligible for Medicaid and urging states to keep prisoners’ names in the Medicaid computers while they’re locked up. (That eases re-enrollment.)

Inmates are generally ineligible for Medicaid while incarcerated. Prison and jail medical systems care for them.

HHS is “providing encouragement and a nudge” to states to improve sign-ups as well as money to upgrade enrollment computers, said Colleen Barry, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who has studied ex-inmate enrollment. “They understand that this is a technology issue.”

Making up to 96,000 halfway-house inmates eligible for Medicaid is new policy, designed to connect people with care before they’re fully released. Prisoners often move to halfway houses or home detention near the end of their terms, closely supervised but frequently allowed to shop, apply for jobs and see a doctor.

Under the new policy, “if you have a fair amount of freedom of movement” in a halfway house, “you’re not considered an inmate” for Medicaid purposes, said Sarah Somers, an attorney for the National Health Law Program, an advocacy group. “That will be very helpful for a lot of people who are trying to transition out of incarceration.”

Ex-inmates have extremely high rates of HIV and hepatitis C infection, diabetes, mental illness and substance abuse problems. They are especially vulnerable after they leave the prison medical system and before they connect with community doctors.

One study in Washington state showed that ex-inmates were a dozen times more likely to die than the general population in the first two weeks after their release.

Immediate Medicaid coverage “can mean the difference between life in the community and recidivism and even life and death,” Michael Botticelli, the White House’s director of national drug control policy, told reporters.

HHS has been urging states to enroll ex-inmates in Medicaid for years. But the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion made many more of them eligible for coverage, giving policymakers a new reason to promote sign-ups, advocates said.

So far 31 states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid under the law.

By Jay Hancock April 29, 2016 Kaiser Health News