#VeteransDay – The Other Side

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The side we don’t want to look at on Veterans Day…

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#MorningMeditationForYourSoul

Losing my sanity

Good morning folks, apparently I got quite a bit side-tracked from my #journeytofreedom and let the cares of this world deter me from my purpose.

I got caught up in Trumpism, the Mueller Investigation, Lies, Russia, Racism, Police Brutality Against Black Folk, Injustices in the Government, Rand, Giuliani, Pirro and yes even #FakeNews.  I was researching other stories that would show every supporter in a negative light (hmmm who was I following for – surely not God]  I got physically tired and overwhelmed with responding verbally to every #Tweet and #FacebookPost…. until I had a [moment of clarity] and realized I was fighting a #battle that was not mine – if I believe in the messages from God in that #Book.

 

I decided to unplug for a day of rest and feed myself with positive and uplifting messages – soon, the clarity returned.  So I’m here to testify that it only takes one day in some situations for God to move and turn-it-around!! I’m determined more than ever to stay on track.

How did you get off track and how did you return to #sanity?

 

Daily Prompt: Captivating

An excerpt from the writer known as Rhacky8

As I read the last paragraph the writer’s post – I was captivated…

…More than ten years past, with an ailing economy, a jobless youth that would rather commit crime than work, an abusive police force that that rewards hooliganism and kidnaps children for the crimes of their parents, and a legislature dominated by greedy individuals representing themselves in parliament and the government still celebrates to the victories of the early 2000s, it is then safe to ask what independence are we celebrating?

While thinking about the past and recent articles about police brutality and shooting of unarmed men I decided to do a quick search on “abusive police force” and here is an excerpt of what I found to be captivating reading:

Self-efficacy is an important aspect of social learning. If a person believes that they are capable of carrying out the behaviour which they have observed and that they are likely to achieve the desired result, then the aggressive act is more likely to be imitated. This helps to explain individual differences in behaviour. It also explains why an individual will behaviour aggressively in one situation where they feel confident of success and not in another where the chances of success are less likely.

When viewing the video clips on social media of police officers beating and beating and beating a man while he’s on the ground screaming in terror, I often think to myself,  what does it look and sound like to the police officer – what are the other officers who are not engaged in the beating thinking or feeling?  What does it mean to be subdued – (when did the definition change), what is their definition of “enough is enough” does the screaming of the [victim] matter (apparently not), does crowd influence the officer to either keep striking or surrender his baton? Do you remember the Rodney King beating!

Albeit Bandura’s piece speaks specifically to children however,  I would bet the farm that the police officers who have and will in the future display aggression towards another individual in the manner they displayed with Rodney King were once children too – that thought is most assuredly – Captivating!

You shall not mistreat any widow or fatherless child.

Woe to those who decree iniquitous decrees, and the writers who keep writing oppression,  to turn aside the needy from justice and to rob the poor of my people of their right, that widows may be their spoil, and that they may make the fatherless their prey!

 

Source:  Bandura, Albert. “Social learning theory of aggression.” Journal of communication 28.3 (1978): 12-29.

via Daily Prompt: Believe

via Daily Prompt: Captivated

Dark Days in Alabama – #Molestation

These Trump supporters trying to rationalize CHILD MOLESTATION in order to justify voting for Roy Moore is so sickening, it’s almost scary.

Alabama legislators passed a law in July 2010 which makes it a felony crime for a school employee to engage in a sex act with a student. The class B felony crime comes with a punishment of two to 20 years in prison, if convicted.

The history of child protection in America is divisible into three eras.

  1. Colonial Times to 1875;
  2. 1875 to 1962 – when nongovernmental organized child protection agencies began to increase;
  3. 1962 marks the era of government sponsored CPS;

One of the members of the panel states that 40 years ago in 1977 this type of behavior was typical of children in Alabama!

In Mobile Alabama on November 14, 2012 jurors listened to the closing arguments in Mobile County on a case of molestation and was unable to reach a moment. Defense attorney Walter Honeycutt reminded jurors during his summation at the girl was vague about when the oral sex occurred but that it was before a fish fry at about 3 p.m. The defendant testified that he could not have molested the child at that time because he regularly volunteered to cook fish fries on Friday afternoons during Lent at his church and would not have been around the girl.

Again – MOBILE, Alabama    – A hung jury has led to a mistrial in the case of a midtown Mobile man accused of sexually abusing two young girls in their bedroom on Mother’s Day night 2013.

Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Tuesday’s Alabama special election, is credibly accused of sexually preying upon a 14-year-old girl and forcing himself upon a 16-year-old girl as a thirtysomething prosecutor.

He is uniquely disqualified from public office separate and apart from those terrible misdeeds.

He was twice removed as chief justice of his state’s highest court for disrespecting the rule of law: in 2003, for disobeying an order to remove a monument of the 10 Commandments; in 2016, for directing probate judges to ignore a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

All I have to say is:

3The fining pot is for silver, and the furnace for gold: but the LORD trieth the hearts. 4A wicked doer giveth heed to false lips; and a liar giveth ear to a naughty tongue. 5Whoso mocketh the poor reproacheth his Maker: and he that is glad at calamities shall not be unpunished. 6Children’s children are the crown of old men; and the glory of children are their fathers. 7Excellent speech becometh not a fool: much less do lying lips a prince. 8A gift is as a precious stone in the eyes of him that hath it: whithersoever it turneth, it prospereth. 9He that covereth a transgression seeketh love; but he that repeateth a matter separateth very friends.

View the Trump Supporters Video Here

Sources: Facebook, Family Law Quarterly, Vol 42, Mobile Jurors; 

McKinley Report  Daily News

The best deterrent to heartache in the life of a child is the presence of a well-informed parent. BE INFORMED~ Donna Funderburke McKinley

 

 

 

 

#FreeSpeech #Kaepernick

Freedom of speech

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

First is the matter of racial equality. When slavery was abolished, it was not by constitutional fiat but by the joining of military necessity with the moral force of a great antislavery movement, acting outside the Constitution and often against the law. The Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments wrote into the Constitution rights that extralegal action had already won. But the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments were ignored for almost a hundred years. The right to equal protection of the law and the right to vote, even the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 underlining the meaning of the equal protection clause, did not become operative until blacks, in the fifteen years following the Montgomery bus boycott, shook up the nation by tumultuous actions inside and outside the law.

The Constitution played a helpful but marginal role in all that. Black people, in the political context of the 1960s, would have demanded equality whether or not the Constitution called for it, just as the antislavery movement demanded abolition even in the absence of constitutional support.
What about the most vaunted of constitutional rights, free speech? Historically, the Supreme Court has given the right to free speech only shaky support, seesawing erratically by sometimes affirming and sometimes overriding restrictions. Whatever a distant Court decided, the real right of citizens to free expression has been determined by the immediate power of the local police on the street, by the employer in the workplace and by the financial limits on the ability to use the mass media.

The existence of a First Amendment has been inspirational but its protection elusive. Its reality has depended on the willingness of citizens, whether labor organizers, socialists or Jehovah’s Witnesses, to insist on their right to speak and write. Liberties have not been given; they have been taken. And whether in the future we have a right to say what we want, or air what we say, will be determined not by the existence of the First Amendment or the latest Supreme Court decision but by whether we are courageous enough to speak up at the risk of being jailed or fired, organized enough to defend our speech against official interference and can command resources enough to get our ideas before a reasonably large public.
The language of the First Amendment looks absolute. “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech.” Yet in 1798, seven years after the First Amendment was adopted, Congress did exactly that, it passed laws abridging the freedom of speech-the Alien and Sedition Acts.

The powerful words of the First Amendment seem to fade with the sounds of war, or near war. The Sedition Act of 1798 expired, but in 1917 when the United States entered World War I, Congress passed another law in direct contradiction of the amendment’s command that “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.” This was the Espionage Act of 1917.

“The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect a man in falsely shouting fire in a theater and causing a panic…. The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.”
… the national government can restrict freedom of speech in relation to foreign policy, through judicial reinterpretations of the First Amendment. But what about state laws restricting freedom of speech or press? For over a century, the First Amendment simply did not apply to the states, because it says, ”Congress shall make no law.” The states could make whatever laws they wanted.

Four years later, however, when a group of people were arrested in a shopping mall for distributing leaflets against the Vietnam War, the Court said they were properly arrested. What was the difference between this case and the other? The union people, the Court said, were expressing themselves about an issue connected with the shopping center. But the Vietnam War had nothing to do with the shopping center, so those people had no First Amendment right to express themselves.’ Much like the kneeling – which is directed towards police brutality of African American folk, yet the anthem, the flag nor football has any connection with police brutality.
The point in all this recounting of cases is that citizens cannot depend on the First Amendment, as interpreted by the courts, to protect freedom of expression. One year the Court will declare, with inspiring words, the right of persons to speak or write as they wish. The next year they will take away that right.

A young black man named Charles MacLaurin learned this by hard experience in the year 1963. That summer, he addressed a group of fifty black people in front of the courthouse in Greenville, Mississippi, protesting the arrest of several young black people who had been demonstrating against racial segregation. It was a peaceful meeting, in which MacLaunn criticized the conviction and urged that blacks register to vote to deal with such injustices. A police officer told McLaurin to move on. He said he had a right to speak and continued. He was arrested, charged with disturbing the peace and resisting arrest, found guilty by the local court, sentenced to six months in jail, and this was affirmed by the Mississippi Supreme Court.
When he appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, he discovered the rule that most citizens (who grow up hearing again and again from some aggrieved person: “I’ll take this to the Supreme Court!”) don’t know: Four of the nine justices must agree to take a case (in technical terms, to grant certiorari). Only three Supreme Court justices voted to take MacLaurin’s case. By now, it was 1967, and so, four years after his conviction, he went to prison.

An even more serious problem with the First Amendment is that most situations involving freedom of expression never make it into the courts. How many people are willing or able to hire a lawyer, spend thousands of dollars, and wait several years to get a possible favorable decision in court? That means that the right of free speech is left largely in the hands of local police. What are policemen likely to be most respectful of-the Constitution, or their own “police powers”?

This is always the price of liberty-taking the risk of going to jail, of being beaten and perhaps being killed.

Source Howard Zinn