One Woman’s Journey to Freedom

Dreams

Dreams many of us have them during waking hours they are known as day dreaming. We dream of places we would like to be, we day dream about a better home, a spouse or perhaps what life would be like if we had more money.  Some of us dream during our sleep – they can be hot spicy dreams or dreams of “real life” experiences and then there are those of us that have dreams of a more spiritual nature.  The story you are about to read is about the latter.  Although the dream is true unlike some dreams that last during the night and they are over the moment we wake up this dream will span more than a decade and continues to evolve as I write this story.

The First Dream

As I awaken from one of the most vivid dreams I had as a child in elementary school I felt a sense of fear, a dark fear.  Our family had just moved to a project community, they are called “the projects” a housing development owned by the government.  Our apartment was located on the 6th floor in the middle building of the complex.  Moving day for a kid can be quite interesting, we don’t really do anything, except get in the way or just run around and watch – and try to stay out of the way.  Up and down the elevator I traveled all day, it was a nice warm day to move and see interesting things.  During this move I can remember 1 or 2 specific incidents.  One was I managed to somehow get away from my parents not by choice, just wandering off; I found myself in the elevator alone.  Apparently, someone (maybe my dad – I loved him so much) taught me how to push the number 6 for my floor and so I did or, so I thought.  I got off and walked straight to the first house on the right like I had done about 6 times already; yet this time I noticed there were some type of hanging twigs or dead flowers on the door, I thought to myself, I’ve never seen those before (from where we had just moved from) I entered the house and to my surprise the house was fully furnished but those people were not my parents.  The house had a strange atmosphere about it, something said to me “get out” and so I did, I didn’t say hello when that lady spoke to me, that man in the chair just looked and never said a word, but when she reach out to touch me – I flew out of that door!

From our building we could see the park across the street, which would later become the walk of horror for me on my way to school. The girls would begin to get angry with me because I had a new outfit on every Monday – that was something not heard of if the projects back in my day. They would taunt me, stick their tongue out at me when after we arrived in class and their favorite line as they passed by my desk was, “…you think you cute…” one would think that was a nice thing to say I learned the hard way that is was not a complement.   You see my dad was always trying to improve and make another dollar more than he did the day before and as a result my mother would always do for us what was not done for her as she grew up.

I also remember always losing my house key – that was tied around my neck with a one of those hair ribbons that was twisted like yarn and it would frizz up; it was irritating around my neck, so I would remove it once I left the house and subsequently I would have go to office – get the master key then walk around the corner to the local supply story to get a replacement; back then replacement keys were .50 cents.  Not sure what significance the losing of the key has to this story but it was a memory that stood out for me and I decided to place it in this introduction.

One night as I climbed into bed and fell asleep I begin to dream.  In the dream I pushed 6 for the floor I lived on and the elevator door would open; when the door opened I found myself on a floor filled with nothing but cylinder columns.  Cement Columns 3I walked off the elevator and looked around for a bit then the fear came I turned to get back on the elevator and to my horror the elevator was gone!  The dream repeated itself over and over again night after night.  This dream repeated itself so much that I found myself able to make decisions during the dream I would remember the events from the last dream, so I wouldn’t get out of the elevator, so it would not disappear on me, to my surprise I found that if I did not get out of the elevator it would still disappear.   During one of the dreams I entered in the elevator and decided not to move, and the elevator disappeared as if I had got off once again forcing me to take that walk – the only relief or freedom from the 6th floor – was waking up.

Dreams in the Bible may…

  • Warn a person not to do something (Genesis 20:3, 31:24, Matthew 27:19)
  • Convey what will happen either in the near or distant future (Genesis 37:5, 9, 40:8 – 19, 41:1 – 7, 15 – 32, Daniel 2, 7)
  • Convey a spiritual truth (Genesis 28:12)
  • Confirm a promise (Genesis 28:13 – 14)
  • To convey to an enemy their destruction (Judges 7:13 – 15)
  • Offer a gift from God (1Kings 3:5)
  • Warn a person they will receive punishment for their sins (Daniel 4)

I would encourage you to tuned for more of my dream…

My He Bless You Beyond Your Comprehension

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Interesting #Bible Questions and Answers

Looking to explore the Bible and have fun take a look at my Facebook Page – click iInteresting Bible Questions and Answersn box to the right with whispy image.

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#NetNeutrality

Attention Net Neutrality prohibits providers like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from speeding up, slowing down and blocking any content, app or website they want.  Strong net neutrality rules don’t just protect companies — they also protect you as a consumer and ensure that you’re getting the full services you’re paying for.  It is the freedom online that we have always had but never noticed. And now, Net Neutrality is in danger of being taken away from us. The Federal Communications Commission wants to get rid of it to enable companies to increase their profit, and it also increases companies’ power to silence any person, group or movement they do not approve of. The fear is that they will be able to manipulate our technological world.Net Neutrality
 

 

 

 

 

Go to www.battleforthenet.com and sign the petition to encourage Congress to stop the FCC’s plan to end net neutrality. We have until Dec 14 to save our freedom online. Sign the petition before it’s too late. Again, it’s http://www.battleforthenet.com. Or go here – Net Neutrality New York Times

 

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Ed Sheeran Speaks On Beyoncé’s Super-Secretive Communication Style: “Her Email Changes Every Week” — Hot 107.5

Source: Kevin Mazur / Getty According to Ed Sheeran, Beyoncé takes all precaution when communicating with the outside world. Sheeran, who recently got Queen Bey to jump on a remix to his hit ballad “Perfect”, spilled the deets to Entertainment Tonight on her very meticulous methods of contact. While most of us can easily reach…

via Ed Sheeran Speaks On Beyoncé’s Super-Secretive Communication Style: “Her Email Changes Every Week” — Hot 107.5

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Donald Trump’s Lawyers Keep Saying the Russia Investigation Will End Soon. Here’s Why — TIME

The White House treated a guilty plea from former national security advisor Michael Flynn last week like the beginning of the end of a special counsel investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. But if history is any guide, it’s far from over. And suggestions that it might be help set the stage for…

via Donald Trump’s Lawyers Keep Saying the Russia Investigation Will End Soon. Here’s Why — TIME

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Sign the #LGBTQ Non-Discrimination Pledge #OpenToAll

Because you don’t live near a bakery doesn’t mean you have to go without cheesecake.

– Hedy Lamarr

Co op Bakery

On December 5, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider the case of a bakery that denied service to a same-sex couple because they are gay. That’s why business leaders nationwide are taking a stand to affirm they are #OpenToAll – and we want you to join us.

Would you sign____________________________?

Businesses for LGBTQ Non-Discrimination Pledge:

Business leaders know that being open to the public means being open to everyone. Inclusion and diversity are critical to a thriving economy and dynamic workforce. Small business leaders across the country affirm the need for comprehensive nondiscrimination that prohibits unequal treatment against LGBTQ people and oppose all efforts to undermine or exempt businesses from the inclusive policies that benefit our businesses and our communities.

Please fill out the form below and add your name to the list of business owners who oppose discrimination and support being #OpenToAll. Your business name and city will be listed on Freedom for All Americans’ website along with hundreds of other businesses and organizations who support inclusive nondiscrimination policies.

I received this in my inbox today and I say No, No I will not sign it – Here’s why – there was a story from Santa Cruz in 1992 – a City Council proposed an ordinance that prohibited discrimination against persons on the basis of “personal appearance.”  Which became known as the “Purple Hair Ordinance” or the “Ugly Ordinance.”  Other wise known as – lookism – according the #Wikipedia – Lookism is a concept used to describe a setting where there exists discriminatory treatment toward physically unattractive people; mainly in the workplace but also in social settings.

First thing came to mind was an article in the Huffington Post – which stated,
“Approximately 100 women gathered last week to contemplate the idea that their skills, talent and intelligence could be overshadowed by a hairstyle. And more often than not, the concern is based on women of color sporting their natural hair.  If one’s employment can be rejected simply by their hair – how is that the rejection of service by an establishment based on sexual orientation requires US Supreme Court intervention?

Example by Kath Manoff a restaurant owner stated, “If someone has 14 earrings in their ears and their nose -and who knows where else – and spiky green air and smells like a skunk…I don’t know why I have to hire them.”

In speaking to the Athenians, Paul stated that God “has made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, and has determined their preappointed times and the boundaries of their dwellings” (Acts 17:26). We are all descendants of Adam. While we are divided between different nations and languages, we are all the same — human beings created by the hand of God.

If that be true then the statement, …”mind of a man could be ascertained by the manner in which he holds his cane.” Would present cause for everyone Black/White/Gay/Straight to have someone stand in the gap and provide “covering” to ensure everyone get an equal opportunity.

To my distress this has never occurred with folk who look like me.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Post, Robert. “Prejudicial appearances: The logic of American antidiscrimination law.” Cal. L. Rev. 88 (2000): 1.

“The Skinny on Job Discrimination.” Fox News, FOX News Network, 20 June 2007, http://www.foxnews.com/story/2007/06/20/skinny-on-job-discrimination.html.

New King James Version Bible

https://secure.businessfwd.org/page/s/lgbtq-pledge

 

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To #Kneel or Not to Kneel

 

President Dokneelnald Trump claimed Tuesday that the National Football League is “having a very hard time” filling stadiums because Americans are “fed up” with players protesting during the national anthem.

But contrary to Trump’s tweet Tuesday, they did not all kneel during the anthem. Ten remained seated, four raised a fist, nine took a knee, and one remained off the field completely, according to an ESPN log.

Is NFL attendance down?

Trump claimed Tuesday that stadiums “are now having a very hard time filling up,” building on a Nov. 20 tweet that attendance was “way down.”

But that’s not true, according to the NFL.

Source:  NBC News

 

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#Veterans Have 24/7/365 Hotline

hotline

WASHINGTON — Today the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced that the White House VA Hotline, first launched in June as part of President Donald J. Trump’s commitment to reforming VA, is now fully staffed with live agents working to serve Veterans 24-hours a day, 365 days a year.

The hotline, which became 24-hour operational in mid-October, is now staffed by a team consisting of 90 percent Veterans or employees who have a Veteran family member, and is in response to Veterans’ requests to talk to agents who could relate to their experiences.

“The White House VA Hotline provides our nation’s Veterans with a direct, dedicated contact line that allows them to interact with highly trained, live agents to answer their needs and concerns,” said VA Secretary David J. Shulkin.

“Since the initial launch of the hotline in June, we listened to our Veterans, who indicated that they prefer speaking with other Veterans and Veteran family members, and we adjusted our hiring based on that feedback,” added Shulkin.

“We’re proud that the hotline is now staffed 24/7 by a team of mostly Veterans or Veteran family members who have direct knowledge of their particular concerns and can use their experience to address them in the best way possible with the resources of the VA.  This represents a true win-win for Veterans and their loved ones.”

Since 24/7 coverage began in October, the hotline has served more than 10,000 callers.

Hotline agents answer inquiries, provide directory assistance, document concerns about VA care, benefits and services, and expedite the referral and resolution of those concerns. Agents undergo regular updates and training on VA services based on hotline trends and are assisted by newly implemented tracking software to help VA capture and improve its response, referral and resolution processes to best support Veterans.

The hotline can be accessed at 855-948-2311 and is VA’s first non-clinical, non-emergency around-the-clock call center. It provides Veterans a supplemental option to report issues if they are not being addressed through VA’s normal customer service channels.

The hotline’s agents are located at a VA facility in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Agents have access to a multitude of resources and contact information to help Veterans. The hotline also generates real-time reports to VA experts who can help address the specific issues of Veterans as well as make better-informed decisions on where program improvements are needed

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December 2017

Get Ready For 2018, Let’s Take This Journey Together!!

 

Take This Journey 2018

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#FreeSpeech #Kaepernick

Freedom of speech

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

First is the matter of racial equality. When slavery was abolished, it was not by constitutional fiat but by the joining of military necessity with the moral force of a great antislavery movement, acting outside the Constitution and often against the law. The Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments wrote into the Constitution rights that extralegal action had already won. But the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments were ignored for almost a hundred years. The right to equal protection of the law and the right to vote, even the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 underlining the meaning of the equal protection clause, did not become operative until blacks, in the fifteen years following the Montgomery bus boycott, shook up the nation by tumultuous actions inside and outside the law.

The Constitution played a helpful but marginal role in all that. Black people, in the political context of the 1960s, would have demanded equality whether or not the Constitution called for it, just as the antislavery movement demanded abolition even in the absence of constitutional support.
What about the most vaunted of constitutional rights, free speech? Historically, the Supreme Court has given the right to free speech only shaky support, seesawing erratically by sometimes affirming and sometimes overriding restrictions. Whatever a distant Court decided, the real right of citizens to free expression has been determined by the immediate power of the local police on the street, by the employer in the workplace and by the financial limits on the ability to use the mass media.

The existence of a First Amendment has been inspirational but its protection elusive. Its reality has depended on the willingness of citizens, whether labor organizers, socialists or Jehovah’s Witnesses, to insist on their right to speak and write. Liberties have not been given; they have been taken. And whether in the future we have a right to say what we want, or air what we say, will be determined not by the existence of the First Amendment or the latest Supreme Court decision but by whether we are courageous enough to speak up at the risk of being jailed or fired, organized enough to defend our speech against official interference and can command resources enough to get our ideas before a reasonably large public.
The language of the First Amendment looks absolute. “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech.” Yet in 1798, seven years after the First Amendment was adopted, Congress did exactly that, it passed laws abridging the freedom of speech-the Alien and Sedition Acts.

The powerful words of the First Amendment seem to fade with the sounds of war, or near war. The Sedition Act of 1798 expired, but in 1917 when the United States entered World War I, Congress passed another law in direct contradiction of the amendment’s command that “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.” This was the Espionage Act of 1917.

“The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect a man in falsely shouting fire in a theater and causing a panic…. The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.”
… the national government can restrict freedom of speech in relation to foreign policy, through judicial reinterpretations of the First Amendment. But what about state laws restricting freedom of speech or press? For over a century, the First Amendment simply did not apply to the states, because it says, ”Congress shall make no law.” The states could make whatever laws they wanted.

Four years later, however, when a group of people were arrested in a shopping mall for distributing leaflets against the Vietnam War, the Court said they were properly arrested. What was the difference between this case and the other? The union people, the Court said, were expressing themselves about an issue connected with the shopping center. But the Vietnam War had nothing to do with the shopping center, so those people had no First Amendment right to express themselves.’ Much like the kneeling – which is directed towards police brutality of African American folk, yet the anthem, the flag nor football has any connection with police brutality.
The point in all this recounting of cases is that citizens cannot depend on the First Amendment, as interpreted by the courts, to protect freedom of expression. One year the Court will declare, with inspiring words, the right of persons to speak or write as they wish. The next year they will take away that right.

A young black man named Charles MacLaurin learned this by hard experience in the year 1963. That summer, he addressed a group of fifty black people in front of the courthouse in Greenville, Mississippi, protesting the arrest of several young black people who had been demonstrating against racial segregation. It was a peaceful meeting, in which MacLaunn criticized the conviction and urged that blacks register to vote to deal with such injustices. A police officer told McLaurin to move on. He said he had a right to speak and continued. He was arrested, charged with disturbing the peace and resisting arrest, found guilty by the local court, sentenced to six months in jail, and this was affirmed by the Mississippi Supreme Court.
When he appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, he discovered the rule that most citizens (who grow up hearing again and again from some aggrieved person: “I’ll take this to the Supreme Court!”) don’t know: Four of the nine justices must agree to take a case (in technical terms, to grant certiorari). Only three Supreme Court justices voted to take MacLaurin’s case. By now, it was 1967, and so, four years after his conviction, he went to prison.

An even more serious problem with the First Amendment is that most situations involving freedom of expression never make it into the courts. How many people are willing or able to hire a lawyer, spend thousands of dollars, and wait several years to get a possible favorable decision in court? That means that the right of free speech is left largely in the hands of local police. What are policemen likely to be most respectful of-the Constitution, or their own “police powers”?

This is always the price of liberty-taking the risk of going to jail, of being beaten and perhaps being killed.

Source Howard Zinn

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