Infection Lapses Rampant in Nursing Homes

But Punishment Is Rare

Basic steps to prevent infections — such as washing hands, isolating contagious patients and keeping ill nurses and aides from coming to work — are routinely ignored in the nation’s nursing homes, endangering residents and spreading hazardous germs…Continue Reading Here

In McDonald’s and Burger King I often (not always) see a sign indicating that the employees are reminded to wash their hands by a sign posted in the restroom.  Children’s elementary schools are covered with hand sanitizer and I’ve noticed in the high school not only is there a LARGE bottle of hand sanitizer but also an inexpensive bottle of lotion/moisturizer (you know they are two different products??) next to each other.

Ludlowe Center for Health and Rehabilitation is an affiliate of National Health Care Associates, a leader in short-term rehabilitation and skilled nursing care services throughout the Northeast. National Health Care’s signature “Passport Rehabilitation” program was specifically designed to meet the needs of individuals requiring a short-term rehabilitative stay following a surgical procedure or an acute medical episode. While on your short-term “trip” with us, please take full advantage of the amenities and services our center offers.

 What our patients and their families are saying

“I would give you 5 Stars!!! My 95+ year young Mom has considered Sands Point Center her home for many years now. She has made many friends there of both residents and staff. The highly competent staff treats my Mom with dignity, and is welcoming and appreciative of family input. We could not have made a better choice for her ongoing care.”

Now I’m wondering where is the Ludlow Center for Health and Rehabilitation information for Bridgeport, CT?  So I click on “Locations – Connecticut” and this is what I see:

Ludlow is an affiliate of National Health Care Associates, a leader in short-term rehabilitation and skilled nursing care services throughout the Northeast. National Health Care’s signature “Passport Rehabilitation” program was specifically designed to meet the needs of individuals requiring a short-term rehabilitative stay following a surgical procedure or an acute medical episode. While on your short-term “trip” with us, please take full advantage of the amenities and services our center offers.

What’s SNF care?

Skilled care is health care given when you need skilled nursing or therapy staff to treat, manage, observe, and evaluate your care.  Examples of SNF care include intravenous injections and physical therapy. Care that can be given by non‑professional staff isn’t considered skilled care. People don’t usually stay in a SNF until they’re completely recovered because Medicare only covers certain SNF care services that are needed daily on a short ‑term basis (up to 100 days).

What Are Some of Your Rights?

Freedom from abuse and neglect —You have the right to be free from verbal, sexual, physical, and mental abuse, involuntary seclusion, and misappropriation of your property by anyone. This includes, but isn’t limited to: SNF staff, other residents, consultants, volunteers, staff from other agencies, family members or legal guardians, friends, or other individuals.

If you feel you’ve been abused or neglected (your needs were not met), report this to the SNF, your family, your local Long Term Care Ombudsman, or your State Survey Agency. It may be appropriate to report the incident of abuse to local law enforcement or the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (their phone number should be posted in the SNF.)

Occupational Therapy —Treatment that helps you return to your usual activities (like bathing, preparing meals, and housekeeping) after illness.

Medicare doesn’t cover custodial care if it’s the only kind of care you need. Custodial care is care that helps you with usual daily activities like getting in and out of bed, eating, bathing, dressing, and using the bathroom. It may also include care that most people do themselves, like using eye drops, oxygen, and taking care of colostomy or bladder catheters.

Then I looked to my right and I see this post from the staff who may or may not be giving the patients a bath daily.

Question:  If a patient of a healthy size is in a SNF and is required to perform physical activities after a fall – wouldn’t it be necessary to allow –  if not give that patient a bath/shower daily?

Happy Holidays!!

 

 

 

 

Source: Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facilities
Ludlow Rehab

 

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Updated – Medicaid & CHIP in North Carolina – Family Planning = Birth Control!

January 5, 2107 – Update –

According to The Christian Monitor – North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D) said Wednesday he plans to expand Medicaid to cover an additional 650,000 people, despite his predecessor having signed a law that expressly prohibits such a move.

Republican State Senate Leader Phil Berger described the governor’s plan as a quote “brazenly illegal attempt to force” Medicaid expansion upon state taxpayers.

Wow, “brazenly illegal” right after attempting to “brazenly” strip the new Governor of North Carolina of his duties – well that’s in another story see – rejection.

Seriously folks, I would like to start with some moments of awareness.  Did you know that in the Middle Ages –  a time between the fall of Rome and the beginning of the Renaissance in the 14th century, mental illness was described as one having a possession of evil spirits?  Interestingly enough the King James Bible states from the book of Corinthians – Wherefore whosoever shall eat of this bread, and drink this cut of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord.  But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord’s body.  For this cause many are weak and sickly amoung you, and many , the author, is indicating that those that do not believe when taking communion shall fall to sickness in the body.  There are folks today like Christian Scientists that believe only in prayer and meditation to relieve all sickness vs. making a doctor visit.

I’m not so sure that homeless men and women (including Veterans) mother’s and children in the beautiful state of North Carolina are either Christian Scientists or even believe in prayer and meditation to relieve their mental and/or physical health issues.  Secondly it was the duty of the King (Governor, Senator, etc.)   to protect the land of the idiots and provide them with the basic necessities of life.

The King who would (in the 21st century be known as the “State”) would take or should be taking the responsibilities of the citizens that fall under the mental illness and/or in need of healthcare category.   Additionally, the Elizabethan Poor Laws and the Poor Law of 1601 can fall under the category of DSS, DCF or Medicaid.

The Title 19 program stems from the 13th century. The idea that relief for the poor was the responsibility of the Church yet how many churches can actually show proof positive that they are financially involved in helping with the fudiciary, judiciary or medical needs of the poor.  Sure they have annual coat drives, food pantries, chicken dinners and raffle tickets, but when was the last time a church in your neighborhood took up a collection for wound care or cash payments for medicine for uninsured children and their families?

It would appear that folks have always been thinking of ways to assist those in need. It also appears that perhaps that only happens outside of North Carolina’s uninsured population.

 

Original Story- Medicaid  CHIP in North Carolina – Family Planning = Birth Control!

 

 birth-control

Medicaid is a health and long-term care coverage program that was enacted in 1965. The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) was established in 1997 to provide new coverage opportunities for children in families with incomes too high to qualify for Medicaid, but who cannot afford private coverage. Both Medicaid and CHIP are administered by states within broad federal guidelines and jointly funded by the federal government and states.

 This page outlines key characteristics of Medicaid and CHIP in North Carolina and provides documents and information relevant to how the programs have been implemented by North Carolina within federal guidelines.

North Carolina Medicaid/CHIPEnrollmentAvg July-Sept2013Total September20160600,0001,200,0001,800,0002,400,000

Period Enrollment
Avg July-Sept 2013 1,595,952
Total September 2016 2,020,076

As of September 2016, North Carolina has enrolled 2,020,076 individuals in Medicaid and CHIP — a net increase of 26.57% since the first Marketplace Open Enrollment Period and related Medicaid program changes in October 2013. North Carolina has adopted one or more of the targeted enrollment strategies outlined in guidance CMS issued on May 17, 2013, designed to facilitate enrollment in Medicaid and CHIP.

The Federally-facilitated marketplace (FFM) offers coverage in North Carolina.

In federal fiscal year (FFY) 2014, North Carolina voluntarily reported 12 of 18 frequently reported health care quality measures in the CMS Medicaid/CHIP Child Core Set. North Carolina voluntarily reported 0 of 10 frequently reported health care quality measures in the CMS Medicaid Adult Core Set.

North Carolina has not expanded coverage to low-income adults… Here’s the thing a homeless woman who is over the age of having children receives 1 physical exam a year and access to birth control – they call it family planning?!

Source: https://www.medicaid.gov/medicaid/by-state/stateprofile.html?state=north-carolina

Is Providing Access to Healthcare After Release from Prison Enough?

Mental Health Care in Jail

Is Providing Access to Healthcare After Release from Prison Enough?

Providing health care after release is a great program, however, most mental illness requires constant review, which does not occur inside the prison walls.  Alana Horowitz Satlin wrote in the Huffington Post, “A 2006 study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that over half of all jail and prison inmates have mental health issues; an estimated 1.25 million suffered from mental illness, over four times the number in 1998. Research suggests that people with mental illness are overrepresented in the criminal justice system by rates of two to four times the normal population. The severity of these illnesses vary, but advocates say that one factor remains steady: with proper treatment, many of these incarcerations could have been avoided.”

Connecticut’s Department of Correction’s Disclaimer reads: “The Department of Correction provides comprehensive health care to the offender population that meets a community standard of care, and includes medical, mental health, dental, addiction and ancillary services, in compliance with applicable state and federal laws and consent decrees. This spectrum of health care is carried out through a partnership the Department has established with the services of the University of Connecticut, Correctional Managed Health Care.”

Suicide Prevention

NCIA’s analysis found that only three departments of correction (California, Delaware, and Louisiana) had suicide prevention policies that addressed all six critical components and that an additional five departments of correction (Connecticut, Hawaii, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania) had policies that addressed all but one critical component.  Thus, only 15 percent of all departments of correction had policies that contained either all or all but one critical component of suicide prevention.  In contrast, 14 departments of correction (27%) had either no suicide prevention policies or limited policies — 3 with none, and 11 with policies that addressed only one or two critical components.  The majority (58%) of DOCs had policies that contained three or four of the critical components.

Medicaid Enrollment for Prisoners

Administration officials moved to improve low Medicaid enrollment for emerging prisoners, urging states to start signups before release and expanding eligibility to thousands of former inmates in halfway houses near the end of their sentences.

Health coverage for ex-inmates “is critical to our goal of reducing recidivism and promoting the public health,” said Richard Frank, assistant secretary for planning for the Department of Health and Human Services.

Advocates praised the changes but cautioned that HHS and states are still far from ensuring that most people leaving prisons and jails are put on Medicaid and get access to treatment.

“It’s highly variable. Some states and jurisdictions are having a lot of success” enrolling ex-prisoners, said Kamala Mallik-Kane, a researcher at the Urban Institute who has studied the process. “Others of them have initiatives in place that aren’t reaching the kinds of numbers that are making a dent.”

The 2010 health law made nearly all ex-prisoners eligible for Medicaid in states that chose to expand the state and federal insurance program for the poor. Many welcomed the chance to cover a group with high rates of chronic disease, mental illness and substance abuse problems.

But prisons and jails, burdened with ineffective computers, understaffing and complicated Medicaid enrollment procedures, have been slow to sign up released inmates.

Federal and state prisons let out more than 600,000 people a year. Millions more cycle through jails. But a study published in Health Affairs found prisons and jails nationwide enrolled only 112,520 emerging inmates between late 2013 up to January 2015.

Much of HHS’ guidance repeats existing policy, reminding states that those on probation or parole are eligible for Medicaid and urging states to keep prisoners’ names in the Medicaid computers while they’re locked up. (That eases re-enrollment.)

Inmates are generally ineligible for Medicaid while incarcerated. Prison and jail medical systems care for them.

HHS is “providing encouragement and a nudge” to states to improve sign-ups as well as money to upgrade enrollment computers, said Colleen Barry, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who has studied ex-inmate enrollment. “They understand that this is a technology issue.”

Making up to 96,000 halfway-house inmates eligible for Medicaid is new policy, designed to connect people with care before they’re fully released. Prisoners often move to halfway houses or home detention near the end of their terms, closely supervised but frequently allowed to shop, apply for jobs and see a doctor.

Under the new policy, “if you have a fair amount of freedom of movement” in a halfway house, “you’re not considered an inmate” for Medicaid purposes, said Sarah Somers, an attorney for the National Health Law Program, an advocacy group. “That will be very helpful for a lot of people who are trying to transition out of incarceration.”

Ex-inmates have extremely high rates of HIV and hepatitis C infection, diabetes, mental illness and substance abuse problems. They are especially vulnerable after they leave the prison medical system and before they connect with community doctors.

One study in Washington state showed that ex-inmates were a dozen times more likely to die than the general population in the first two weeks after their release.

Immediate Medicaid coverage “can mean the difference between life in the community and recidivism and even life and death,” Michael Botticelli, the White House’s director of national drug control policy, told reporters.

HHS has been urging states to enroll ex-inmates in Medicaid for years. But the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion made many more of them eligible for coverage, giving policymakers a new reason to promote sign-ups, advocates said.

So far 31 states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid under the law.

By Jay Hancock April 29, 2016 Kaiser Health News